Transform Thinking….Transform the World

JC:HEM Recruiting Subject Matter Experts for Next Round of Curriculum Transformation

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Explore a new frontier in on-line education!

Jesuit Commons: Higher Education at the Margins has received funding to transform the curriculum of its Diploma in Liberal Studies. This new curriculum will comprise thirty new courses to be undertaken by students at the margins all over the world.

We are currently looking to recruit Subject Matter Experts (SME) to lead the development of these new courses. Building on the work of our Curriculum Oversight and Steering Committee and the development of our first 5 courses this Spring, we are looking to recruit SMEs in:

Ethics

Within our Business Concentration

Introduction to Financial Management
Introduction to Organizational Behaviour and Management
Introduction to Entrepreneurship
Introduction to Accounting

Within our Education Concentration

Foundational and Historical Perspectives on Education
Educational Psychology Creating and Managing Learning Environments
Instruction across Cultures and Exceptionalities
The Practical Application of Teaching A work-for-hire stipend of $3,000 ($1,000  at the completion of the design and $2,000 at the completion of the  production) will be paid.  Courses will be developed for, and owned by JC:HEM and will marketed for delivery to students at the margins. This group of SME’s will meet between 20-24 February 2015 in New Orleans, USA for briefing and orientation.

SME’s should have a Doctorate or terminal degree, in the relevant discipline, be eminent in their field, and experience of, and commitment to, high quality on-line higher education.

If you, or other faculty are interested in exploring this further, please contact our Chief Academic Officer, Dr Neil Sparnon,neil.sparnon@jc-hem.org with details of your resume and interests by 10 January 2015.

Explore a new frontier in online education! Jesuit Commons: Higher Education at the Margins has received funding to transform the curriculum of its Diploma in Liberal Studies. This new curriculum will comprise thirty new courses to be undertaken by students at the margins all over the world. We are currently looking to recruit Subject Matter Experts (SME) to lead the development of these new courses. Building on the work of our Curriculum Oversight and Steering Committee and the development of our first 5 courses this Spring, we are looking to recruit SMEs in a range of subject areas.

Finding Ways to do Transformation: New Certificate Program for JC:HEM Alumni
“I think this is very doable for other schools to take on similar projects. Doing this work is rewarding and enriching. It is transformative education at its best and I think all schools strive to find ways to do transformation.“ – Dr. Rosemarie Hunter
Speaking from her office at the University of Utah, US, Dr. Rosemarie, Special Assistant to the President for Campus Community Partnerships said, “I first heard of JC:HEM when a colleague of mine, Lazarina Topuzova joined the faculty of Gonzaga University. Lazi introduced me to Mary McFarland Then in the Summer of 2011, when working in refugee camps in Mae Hong Son, Thailand, I met Father Joe with Jesuit Refugee Services …and again, JRS suggest I connect with JC:HEM we began having conversations with Mary and Tom McFarland and thinking about the intersections in our work. I taught the Culture in Education for JC:HEM during the Summer 2013.  I taught 2 sections, with students in Kenya and Malawi.   The students are highly motivated and open to learning.  They are eager to learn new ways that will assist their communities.  With diverse life experiences, the students have a wealth of opportunities to share and learn from each other.

The curriculum for this program was the result of a year-long process of meetings and focus groups with leaders and representatives of communities of immigrant and refugee background.  New arriving communities met with faculty from the College of Social Work to talk about the needs and also the strengths of these communities. It assist us with developing an assets-based approach to Case Management that centers community and cultural knowledge.  Salt Lake City is a preferred city for refugee resettlement.  With 50,000 individuals of refugee background, we have now documented 117 languages and dialects in the city.

The four online courses that fulfill the requirements of the CMC program utilize a capacity building and empowerment framework that makes use of critical perspectives and strives to be inclusive of all voices.  Upon completion of the CMC program, students will be able to: understand and practice basic social work theory and skills; communicate effectively with individuals, families, and communities; understand and practice common case management roles, processes and responsibilities in a multicultural context; and act as system change agents in ways that empower individuals, families and groups.

Background

The Case Management Certificate program was created as a response to community priorities. In response to the high number of individuals of refugee experiences (50,000 currently with 1,100 new arrivals annually) resettling along the Wasatch front, the Utah State Refugee Services Office (RSO) and local resettlement agencies (IRC, CCS) began an initiative to support the development of Community-Based Organizations (CBOs), also referred to as Mutual Assistance Associations (MAA) (i.e. United African Association, Sudanese Association of Utah, Somali Organization, etc.). At the same time, there has been a growth in similar organizations serving the Latina/o communities and special needs populations (i.e., Autism Project of Utah, NAMI Latino) (Hunter & Mileski, 2013).

The goals of these organizations are to provide a first response to the new arriving and underrepresented groups and to act as an information, referral, and crisis response network connecting new communities to existing resources and systems. Training and empowering community leaders from each population/group are successful vehicles for reducing system barriers and supporting the whole community (Kretzmann & McKnight, 1993). These individuals are already identified as leaders in their communities; therefore, they are often in the best position to understand the needs and strengths of their communities, the cultural issues involved, and begin from a space of trust and familiarity that many social service providers do not have. In this way, community-based leaders are the first contact for successful integration of new arriving populations that will ultimately connect new Americans and underrepresented communities to existing systems (Hunter, Mai, Hollister, & Jankey, 2011). While community-based leaders come with a strong skill set, they too may lack an understanding of the resources and systems in the U.S. As a group, the service agencies and local leaders have approached University Neighborhood Partners (UNP) and the College of Social Work to provide training on the systems and services that are available to the community and appropriate ways of making referrals and accessing services (Hunter & Mileski, 2013). The Case Management Certificate program is the outcome of a yearlong community-based research project engaging stakeholders along the way in identification of community needs and strengths, as well as participation in the development of the curriculum.

Partnership with JC:HEM

In addition to the local market, the CSW has an emerging international community of stakeholders.  The CSW and UNP have formed a partnership with Jesuit Commons: Higher Education on the Margins (JC:HEM). [For more information visit http://www.jc-hem.org/]. As part of this partnership, the CSW will offer the online CMC program to marginalized communities internationally (Kenya, Malawi, Jordan). The delivery of the CMC program to refugee camps is a first step in our shared view of online education as a point of increased access and educational equity for communities underrepresented in higher education. Over the next few years, we envision developing online learning environments that bring together diverse students from multiple locations and life experiences (traditional U of U students, students currently living in refugee camps, domestic students who are underrepresented in higher education) to create unique learning communities.

Partnering with JC:HEM

It has been exciting to partner with JC:HEM.  I think one of the many things that I have learned form JC:HEM is that they do not say “No”, they are committed to finding a way to respond.  JC:HEM lives the mission of “transforming thinking and transforming the world.”  Also, there are always a network of people ready to respond and assist.  In terms of support, I would encourage those who can to donate to this important work. For others, it may be that you get engaged with teaching or providing support for an in country teacher.  I think this is very doable for other schools to take on similar projects.  Doing this work is rewarding and enriching. It is transformative education at its best and I think all schools strive to find ways to do transformation.  I think the JC:HEM community and partner are the experts!!

I think there are many roles in the camps that will benefit from this training.  Case Management is about working with individuals, families and communities.  From working as teachers, psychosocial workers, medics, youth workers, community workers, etc., the case management training will assist individuals with the tools they need to assess issues and apply solutions that are strengths focused.  Similarly the case management model is highly collaborative and is built on the idea of collective action. “

JC:HEM is the recipient of a Certificate Program that will support refugees in the Dzaleka and Kakuma Refugee Camps in Malawi and Kenya Africa to prepare entry-level case managers working in community-based organizations (CBO), social service, and resettlement agencies. The CMC program is the outcome of a university-community partnership.

Changing Cultures

Congolese rap artist Menes performs at The Sunset Sessions _ Maria Thundu2
Firstly, he’s raising money to record his debut album under his stage name, Menes. However, this is not a vanity project. It is built around collaborations between Tresor and other artists from Malawi. The cultural collaboration is designed to showcase the benefits of working together, and promote harmony in a country which is often still suspicious of the refugee population it supports. The campaign https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/menes-to-record-album-mon-delire has already received a great amount of attention and support, but as it comes to its close, any last contributions could take it to its target.

Secondly, he’s developed and is directing the first cultural festival to take place in Dzaleka. Named after the Swahili word for hope, the Tumaini Festival, will bring artists and fans from around the camp and Malawi to perform in and experience Dzaleka for the first time. A new refugee-led approach to creating understanding of refugees and the refugee experience in the country, he hopes it will become an annual event. For more on the festival, check https://www.facebook.com/tumainifestival
Amidst all this, he’s been invited to present at the TEDxLilongwe and TEDYouth events taking place in Malawi’s capital in the coming weeks.

Tresor says his journey to this point started with his involvement in the CSLTs, and that they provided a turning point in his life in Malawi. “If you run away from your dreams, they will run after you till they catch you again. After completing a Community Service Learning Track, I was involved in volunteering in the community. Through doing this I made new friends who connected me with people and venues outside of camp for performances, and from there I started doing again what I love and what I am passionate to do.”

One CSLT alumnus’ mission to change perceptions of refugees through art and culture. In person, Tresor Nzengu Mpauni is quite softly spoken, but supremely affable. This good-natured, jovial manner is probably the first thing to break down people’s preconceptions of the kind of person Tresor, as a refugee, might be. But he doesn’t stop there. Since completing CSLTs (in Communication and Performing Arts) at JC:HEM in Dzaleka, Tresor has been progressively rewriting the rules of what a refugee can achieve in Malawi. His live performance poetry, backed by a talented band, also from Dzaleka, has already seen him established as the number one French-language artist in the English-speaking nation, appearing at major shows and the country’s biggest festivals up and down the country. Now in November, he’s embarking on his most ambitious series of projects yet, united by a common goal, to use talent and culture to bring refugees and Malawians together.

Scholarships Provide Much Needed Hope to Refugees in Africa

JC:HEM alumni Muzabel Welongo was the first recipient of the JC:HEM Scholarship program.
JC:HEM alumni Muzabel Welongo was the first recipient of the JC:HEM Scholarship program.
If JC:HEM could not exist in this camp it would create a very big gap. I have seen change in the three years JC:HEM has been in the camp. It’s only three years and if you walk away, in each community you would find that people have been trained by the different programs offered by JC:HEM , either by diploma or certificates. And at least 80% are influencing change in the society with the skills they are getting from JC:HEM. So how can you influence change if you don’t have the educational opportunities?

Students began fervently looking for a means to sustain their education, when JC:HEM received a generous donation from an anonymous donor that will offer several scholarships to students in the JC:HEM Diploma program. “This scholarship comes at an opportune time, when our graduates are looking for ways to further their education. Many of them are passionate about this and have been applying for colleges, so this scholarship is significant,” stated Karen Cordova the JC:HEM Alumni Coordinator.
Although this scholarship will support several of the students, Cordova cautioned there were many other students in need of financial assistance. “These are students in refugee camps who do not have the financial means to further their education without a scholarship. And this is easily doable, because the cost of attending a school in Africa is a fraction of the cost for a US education. So for minimum input, students in these remote refugee camps can get a University education that will change their lives forever. With education brings hope and these students, all of them, continue to talk about their need to give back to their community. I have no doubt they will be the leaders of their communities and of Africa and this is when you see maximum output from even a modest scholarship. If you want to see change, watch these students create dynamic positive change in their communities. They have the passion so all they need is some assistance to get there.”

Students in the JC:HEM program received their diploma after working in online courses at the Arrupe Learning Centers at each camp which provides them with a Diploma in Liberal Arts. Those in the program were chosen out of hundreds of applicants. “There are literally thousands of people in this camp. It is because of JC:HEM that even the grade school children now have a goal to further their education. Before JC:HEM many in this community finished had never seen a University. This is a significant paradigm shift in a community that for years never had opportunities to stimulate their intellectual capabilities. One student talked about higher education as ‘feeding her soul”. I can’t image living to exist, to take each day with little rations, waiting around for someone else to make a difference for you. Having a university for people living at the margins creates an impact that will be seen for years to come.”

As a recent graduate of the JC:HEM Diploma program, Muzabel Welongo agrees, “If JC:HEM could not exist in this camp it would create a very big gap. I have seen change in the three years JC:HEM has been in the camp. It’s only three years and if you walk away, in each community you would find that people have been trained by the different programs offered by JC:HEM , either by diploma or certificates. And at least 80% are influencing change in the society with the skills they are getting from JC:HEM. So how can you influence change if you don’t have the educational opportunities? “

Kakuma, 12 October 2014 – Soon after the JC:HEM graduation celebrations subsided in Kakuma and Dzaleka refugee camps, the graduates are now actively applying at various universities with a passionate desire to continue their education.

2014 JC:HEM GRADUATION CELEBRATION

2014 JC:HEM Diploma Students Graduate in Kakuma Refugee Camp, Kenya Africa.
2014 JC:HEM Diploma Students Graduate in Kakuma Refugee Camp, Kenya Africa.
“When I started I was considered that I am nobody so with the small knowledge I become from nobody to somebody, and this is self-esteem.” – Mirindi Kabumbe

Jesuit Commons: Higher Education at the Margins (JC:HEM) celebrated its second year of graduation ceremonies on September 21st in Kakuma, Kenya and on September 25th in Dzaleka, Malawi. Both Kakuma and Dzaleka are Refugee Camps located in Northeastern Africa. There was a total of 43 graduates who celebrated with their classmate’s, family and friends who gathered for this momentous occasion. Students receive a Diploma in Liberal Studies with concentrations in Business or Education.

Special guests who attended the ceremony included the Chancellor of the Catholic University of Malawi, and a representative from Mzuzu University. Everyone was honored to have President Fr. John Fitzgibbons , SJ from Regis University and Fr. Peter Balleis, SJ the International Director of the Jesuit Refugee Service also in attendance.

There were several highlights at the ceremonies but one particular moving tribute was from a video showing several faculty clips congratulating students on meeting their graduation goal. “Since the coursework and teaching is done online, faculty couldn’t attend the ceremony to celebrate with their students. This was one way for them be present and show their support to their students,” said Karen Cordova, JC:HEM Alumni Coordinator. One graduate, Paul Harerimana from Dzaleka said this about his instructors, “I am proud to have known instructors and many others people whom we worked together in many corners of the world.”

It was noted that several graduates are moving on to continue their education. This includes Bol Daniel who is now studying at a University in Kenya. He travelled back to Kakuma just for the graduation celebrations. Stephen Odi, a 2013 graduated learned he has been admitted to CUEA, a 2014 graduate, Japhet Rugema from Malawi, has been admitted to a University in Malawi.

When the students were asked for a specific example of how the Diploma program helped them put new knowledge into action, one student, Gilbert Baseswa Karindi told this story: “I was digging toilets (in Dzaleka) and started to notice that at about 5 meters down the soil turned white… I took some home and mixed it with water and started to paint my house… people liked it. Then I noticed at about 7 meters there was another color, so I did the same thing with that soil, and painted the inside of my house. The neighbors started to ask me to paint their house. Now I buy cans for about 500 kwacha, make white paint and colored paint and sell it for about 1,500 kwacha. With my studies, I learned to be an entrepreneur and now I’m making a living”.

Several other graduates reflected on their journey through the JC:HEM program. Sylvain Ruhamya Canga was Valedictorian and graduation speaker in the Kakuma ceremony. She stated, “It is a honor again to let me tell you about me. I was a human rights activist back home. Let me attach my CV so that you have a better picture of mine. So far, I am intending to write about my life in the camp, where I have spent 8 years. Right now, I am on my way to Israel for my masters in Global Community Development with Hebrew University of Jerusalem. I also have a vision to be a professor so as I also participate in the education at the margins. The only way I can show gratitude to JCHEM is by volunteering like those professors who sacrifice a lot in order to train the needy people I have been.”

Petronil Zaina from Dzaleka, Malawi stated, “When I first came into the JC: HEM program I didn’t know if it could be able to finish the entire program because, I felt like I had suffered more than anyone. I thank God for accomplishing my dream and make the success to my expectation, as I am graduating I feel like my life have a meaning and I have never had any regrets to my time I spend in refugee camp because JC: HEM has changed my identity, pain, confusion, frustration and thinking into something powerful and positive. Now I realize that courage is key of success.

It was a long journey with many challenges. I gained new skills which are associated with understanding the value of knowledge, by accepting others for who and what they are, regardless of societies interpretations what I gained for all these past years is not for myself but the all community, my expectation is to make a good contribution in the community, and building on the desire to always do and become more, serving my fellow refugees in interpreting is working for the community, now my proudest moment is on 26th September 2014 my graduation day. Ubuntu has no border.”

Several other graduates wanted to share their experience of being in the JC:HEM program and how the program affected their lives. Here are some of the highlights:

“When I started I was considered that I am nobody so with the small knowledge I become from nobody to somebody, and this is self-esteem.” – Mirindi Kabumbe

“I am very proud with JC:HEM because it is helped me to be opened in the community, and I worked with SGBV, I worked with them as interpreter.” – Felix Monko

“I am very grateful with JCH: HEM program with all the stockholders, with tutors, who have been assisting students- so want JC: HEM may continue to do the same thing to other people, to other displaced peoples.” –Antoine Masirika

“The courses such as intercultural communication, interpersonal communication has helped me a lot, and like I am today. It is very interesting because I see myself as successful person. And the diploma that I am going to receive shows that I am well equipped and I can help the world.”–John Chimsewu

To explain the depth of the program and the collective effort to make it a success, Mary McFarland, JC:HEM International Director had this to say, “We are all very much a part of the graduations in Kakuma and Dzaleka that changed the day for so many. The students can’t get over all the support from so many people.”

Lukogon Byona from Dzaleka said what many of the students were expressing, “I am proud of what I have achieved, I am a changed man.”

Jesuit Commons: Higher Education at the Margins (JC:HEM) celebrated its second year of graduation ceremonies on September 21st in Kakuma, Kenya and on September 25th in Dzaleka, Malawi. Both Kakuma and Dzaleka are Refugee Camps located in Northeastern Africa. There was a total of 43 graduates who celebrated with their classmate’s, family and friends who gathered for this momentous occasion. Students receive a Diploma in Liberal Studies with concentrations in Business or Education.

Jesuit Commons: Higher Education at the Margins (JC:HEM) is an initiative of the Society of Jesus that brings Jesuit higher education to those at the margins of our society. It draws on the rich and centuries long Jesuit tradition of higher education and mobilizes the resources of the Jesuit worldwide network of educational institutions. www.jc-hem.org @JCHEMUpdates LinkedIn Group

Transform Newsletter: December 2014
Editor: Neil Sparnon

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